WordPress Plugin Development, 2nd Ed

Author: Brad Williams, Justin Tadlock, John James Jacoby
Publisher: Wrox
Pages: 480
ISBN: 978-1119666943
Print: 1119666945
Kindle: B0899MW9CP
Audience: WordPress developers
Rating: 4.5
Reviewer: Kay Ewbank

The authors of this book are well-known in the WordPress world, with more than 100 published plugins between them. Of course, that doesn't mean they can tell other developers how to write plugins, but it's a good start.

The book starts with an introduction to plugins - what they are, where to find available ones, their advantages and how to install and manage them. They then move on to discussing how to create and use plugins. That might seem to cover the whole landscape of the book, but it's just an overview, and is followed by a discussion on how to create and use dashboards, menus and submenus, and how to interact with the options and settings APIs.

 

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Security and performance considerations are looked at next, including data validation and sanitizing, formatting SQL statements, and security good habits, caching and transients.

The more interesting parts of the book build on from here, starting with a good explanation of hooks, actions and filters. A chapter on JavaScript comes next, followed by a detailed description of Blocks and Gutenberg.

A chapter on content  looks at custom post types, post metadata, meta boxes and custom taxonomies. The authors then move on to how to interact with users and user data before looking at scheduled tasks and Cron. They then look at internationalization, localization and translation files.

The third part of the book is more about the internals, with chapters on the Rest API and the HTTP API. There's a really interesting chapter on Multisite, what it can do, and how to enable it in WordPress. A chapter titled 'the kitchen sink' rounds up things like shortcodes, widgets, rewrite rules and the heartbeat API that haven't been covered elsewhere.

The book ends with a chapter on debugging and a final chapter on the developer toolbox - essentially a roundup of the resources and tools available to the WordPress developer.

Overall, this is a very good book, and if you're writing WordPress plugins you should read it and follow its advice. I'd have liked a bit more overview, but it's a very minor niggle, and it shouldn't put you off buying and benefiting from this book.

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Teach Yourself Java in 21 Days, 8th Ed (Sams)

Author:  Rogers Cadenhead
Publisher: Sams
Pages: 672
ISBN:  978-0672337956
Print: 0672337959
Kindle:B082J486LS
Audience: Beginning Java Programmers
Rating: 4
Reviewer: Mike James
Java! Its still more than relevant and at edition 8 this must be a classic?



Query Store For SQL Server 2019

Author: Tracy Boggiano and Grant Fritchey
Publisher: Apress
Pages:219
ISBN: 978-1484250037
Print: 1484250036
Kindle: B07YNL3X4X
Audience: Users and developers of SQL Server queries
Rating: 5
Reviewer: Kay Ewbank

This book looks at the new Query Store feature in SQL Server and how you can use it to iden [ ... ]


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