Web Development with Clojure

Author: Dmitri Sotnikov 
Publisher: Pragmatic Bookshelf
Pages:308 
ISBN: 978-1680500820
Print:1680500821
Kindle: B01KU8O24G
Audience: Clojure Programmers
Rating: 4
Reviewer: Mike James 

Clojure and websites aren't natural partners. Can this book convince otherwise?

Clojure is a Lisp-like language that runs on the JVM. You can probably guess that as a Lisp-like language it probably isn't going to be a very popular one. You might, however, be surprised to learn that it is currently 50th in the TIOBE rankings. While you can't take the TIOBE index as absolute fact, it does give you some idea where a language fits into the ecosystem. If I tell you that languages above Clojure include ActionScript, Hack, LadderLogic, Groovy, Prolog, Scheme and so on. Some of these you probably haven't heard of and ActionScript is a dead language because it is the language of Flash. 

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So while this book might be good, I need to warn you from the start that using Clojure to develop web sites is going to be a lonely occupation. A second small problem is that the software used is something that the author thought up. There is sometimes a big bonus in reading a book by the creator of the software being described but usually only when that software has been massively successful. When this isn't the case the books generally read more like an advertising pitch. This book doesn't read like an advert for the author's own software but it is an unashamed hard sell on Clojure and the Clojure way to create website. 

 

 

 

The book starts off with a basic website implementation. This is where you get all of the components in place. Chapter 2 introduces Luminus, the author's software and Chapter 3 moves on to explaining its architecture.

Chapter 4 is about adding ClojureScript support; ClojureScript compiles to JavaScript.

Chapter 5 moves on to using websockets for real time messaging. Chapter 6 is about implementing REST and Chapter 7 is on database. Finally we have a big example - a picture gallery. The book closes with general topics such as unit testing. There are also five appendixes including a quick Clojure primer, how to use OAuth and non-SQL databases. 

The book is easy to read and there are lots of examples. Some of the example are big and you are going to have to work hard to follow. I also don't think that this is a first book on Clojure you should read. The primer in the appendix isn't enough as Clojure is a somewhat different language - you would probably cope if you already knew Lisp or another Lisp-like language.

Even if you are not interested in using Clojure to implement a website, this is a useful book of practical Clojure example code. 

 

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Metaprogramming Ruby 2

Author: Paolo Perrotta
Publisher:  Pragmatic Bookshelf
Pages:250 
ISBN: 978-1941222126
Print: 1941222129
Kindle: B00N9I0RMQ
Audience:Ruby programmers
Rating: 5
Reviewer: Ian Elliot

A second edition of a book that claims to teach you "meta" programming. Isn't just programming h [ ... ]



The CS Detective

Author: Jeremy Kubica
Publisher: No Starch Press
Pages: 256
ISBN: 978-1593277499
Print: 1593277490
Kindle: B01J92NR0Y
Audience: Computer Science newbies
Rating: 4
Reviewer: Sue Gee

The idea of teaching computer science via a detective story sounds as if it could be fun and appeal to a  [ ... ]


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Last Updated ( Saturday, 13 May 2017 )