How Google Tests Software

Author:James A. Whittaker, Jason Arbon & Jeff Carollo
Publisher: Addison-Wesley
Pages: 320
ISBN: 978-0321803023
Audience: Testers, managers and executives
Rating: 3.5
Reviewer: Mike James

The trouble with this book's title is that invites the humorous response "Google tests software?" which said in the right tone of voice is funny.

The point is that we all test software but do we make a determined enough effort? Google is big and produces lots of lines of code, many we never see in the outside world so yes it is of greatest interest to discover how Google tests its software and the line on the cover "Help me test like Google" is a promise worth investigating.

The trouble is as soon as you open the book you find too many slightly breathless self congratulations on having written the book at all. Testing isn't rocket science - or at least I don't think it is - perhaps the book will enlighten me and justify the initial hype.

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The first chapter sets the scene and describes how Google takes testing seriously. It spends a lot time defining the roles of employees in testing: SWE - SoftWare Engineer, TE - Test Engineer, and so on. This is mostly about management organization and setting out mission statements.

Chapter 2 promises some technical details but it starts off with as much waffle as the first chapter then suddenly there is a short example with some code. It is welcome but completely out of place in the rest of the book. The chapter closes with a look at test sizes and interviews with some people involved in testing.

From here the book moves deeper into management and organizational issues. There are lots of fairly obvious statements that are effectively commonsense or motivational slogans - keep it simple, C is for component, and so on. There is some technical stuff hidden in there - bug metrics mainly - but the coverage is mostly of management issues - interviewing test engineers and so on. Some parts are of general interest like the Chrome OS test lab box out but at the end of the day this is not a book you want to read if it is testing technology and methodologies you are really interested in.

Overall, the style is readable but there is far too much self-congratulatory prose and cheerleading for Google. It eventually becomes tiring to keep being told how wonderful Google, and Google's approach to testing, is. It would be much better to lay the facts down and let the reader appreciate the awe.

If you are a test engineer, planning to become a test engineer, or are responsible for managing a test department then you will find this book relevant and maybe even informative. If you inhabit a more general space then it won't really tell you much about testing or creating better quality software. 

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T-SQL Querying

Authors: Itzik Ben-Gan, Adam Machanic, Dejan Sarka & Kevin Farlee
Publisher: Microsoft Press
Pages: 864
ISBN: 9780735685048
Print:  0735685045
Kindle: B00TPRWVHY
Audience: DBAs and developers
Rating: 4.8
Reviewer: Ian Stirk

This book from SolidQ aims to give you a deeper u [ ... ]



Blockchain For Dummies

Author: Tiana Laurence
Publisher: Wiley
Date: May 2017
Pages: 240
ISBN: 978-1119365594
Print: 1119365597
Kindle: B06ZY3YDDK
Audience: Non-technical users
Rating: 3
Reviewer: Alex Armstrong

The blockchain's best days are far from over, so why not read a book suitable for dummies?


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Last Updated ( Saturday, 06 October 2012 )