Math for Programmers (Manning)
Friday, 15 January 2021

With the subtitle, "3D graphics, machine learning, and simulations with Python", this book aims to provide the strong math skills you need to qualify for jobs in data science, machine learning, computer graphics, or cryptography. With lots of helpful graphics and more than 300 exercises and mini-projects, Paul Orland teaches the math you need for these hot careers, concentrating on what you need to know as a developer. 

<ASIN:1617295353>


Purchase of the print book includes a free eBook in PDF, Kindle, and ePub formats from Manning Publications.

Author: Paul Orland
Publisher: Manning Publications
Date: January 2021
Pages: 688
ISBN: 978-1617295355
Print: 1617295353
Audience: Python developers interested in math
Level: Intermediate
Category: Mathematics and Python

mathforprog

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