Why Brains Don't Compute (Springer)
Friday, 28 May 2021

This book examines what seems to be the basic challenge in neuroscience today: understanding how experience generated by the human brain is related to the physical world we live in. Dale Purves presents in 25 short chapters the argument and evidence that brains address this problem on a wholly trial and error basis. The goal is to encourage neuroscientists, computer scientists, philosophers, and other interested readers to consider this concept of neural function and its implications, not least of which is the conclusion that brains don’t “compute.”

<ASIN:3030710637>

 

Author: Dale Purves
Publisher: Springer
Date: May 2021
Pages: 183
ISBN: 978-3030710637
Print: 3030710637
Kindle: B094FB5ZMG
Audience: General interest
Level: Intermediate
Category: Artificial Intelligence

whybrains

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Java In Easy Steps, 7th Ed

Author: Mike McGrath
Publisher: Easy Steps
Date: August 2019
Pages: 192
ISBN: 978-1840788730
Print: 1840788739
Kindle: B00EZTAULQ
Audience: Java beginners
Rating: 4
Reviewer: Alex Armstrong

Will this slim book it get you off the starting blocks learning the huge Java language?



Beautiful Architecture: Leading Thinkers Reveal the Hidden Beauty in Software Design

Author: Diomidis Spinellis & Georgios Gousios
Publisher: O'Reilly, 2009
Pages: 426
ISBN: 978-0596517984
Print: 059651798X
Kindle: B0043GXMRA
Audiance: Anyone with professional interest in programming
Rating: 4
Reviewed by: Mike James 

This thought-provoking collection of essays still qu [ ... ]


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